Higher Education Not Keeping Pace with the Changing Needs of “Nontraditional Students,” Study Finds

WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Seventy percent of Americans who have pursued a Bachelor’s degree qualify as nontraditional students, according to the 2016 College Experience Survey from Strayer University and U.S. News & World Report’s Marketing and Business Intelligence Teams. The study found that nontraditional students are more demographically diverse and place more value on scheduling flexibility, employability, and affordability than traditional 18-24 year-old college students. “Earning a degree is a competing priority, as these students also juggle full-time jobs, family and personal commitments. Colleges and universities must embrace online learning and offer greater affordability and scheduling flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of this growing student population.” Tweet this Key demographic findings from the survey include: Nontraditional students currently earn higher wages 58 percent of nontraditional students earn $60,000 per year or more, compared to 43 percent of traditional students Nontraditional students are more likely to be currently employed full-time “Nontraditional students now make up a near majority of college students,” said Karl McDonnell, CEO of Strayer Education, Inc., Strayer University’s parent company. “Earning a degree is a competing priority, as these students also juggle full-time jobs, family and personal commitments. Colleges and universities must embrace online learning and offer greater affordability and scheduling flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of this growing student population.” The study found that nontraditional students were more likely than traditional students to choose...

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